panOpticon is a dream tool —
perfect for the extensive amounts of information
one must organize when creating a catalogue

 
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“The ease with which we can document data, upload images, create lists and notes as part of our daily research has allowed us to expand our archives in so many ways.

“We can’t imagine a better system for this process.”

Debra Burchett-Lere
Director, Sam Francis Foundation
Sam Francis: Online Catalogue Raisonné Project

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Top of page from left to right in descending order: Paul Cézanne (1839–1906) Still Life with Apples 1895-98,
The Museum of Modern Art: Lillie P. Bliss Collection (22.1934); László Moholy-Nagy (1895–1946) Head (Lucia Moholy), c. 1926 The Museum of Modern Art: Anonymous gift (505.1939). © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn; Kay Sage (1898–1963) The Great Impossible 1961, The Museum of Modern Art: Kay Sage Tanguy Bequest (1132.1964); Peter Campus (1937– ), video installation created 1975, acquired 1993 SFMOMA: Accessions Committee Fund: gift of Barbara Bass Bakar, Doris and Donald Fisher, Pam and Dick Kramlich, Leanne B. Roberts, and Norah and Norman Stone. © Peter Campus; Eugen Schönebeck (1936- ), Untitled, pen and tusche on paper, 1962. Photo courtesy Galerie Judin, Berlin; Larry Bell (1939– ) Standing Walls (detail, from 6 X 6 an improvisation). Photo © Alex Marks, courtesy The Chinati Foundation, Marfa, TX; Fitz Henry Lane (1804–65) Lighthouse at Camden, Maine 1851. Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Conn., Gift of the Teresa and H. John Heinz III Foundation (1992.122.1). Photo: Yale University Art Gallery; Roy Lichtenstein (1923–97) Girl with Ball, 1961. The Museum of Modern Art: Gift of Philip Johnson. (421.1981); John Singer Sargent (1856–1925) The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit, 1882. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston: Gift of Mary Louisa Boit, Julia Overing Boit, Jane Hubbard Boit, and Florence D. Boit in memory of their father, Edward Darley Boit. Photo: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.

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