panOpticon is structured to help you
document the data around the artworks of an individual artist
and make that data useful for others to interpret and reuse

 #panopticoncr

 

Establishing and managing control over data is of vital importance for artists, their family members and their heirs, artist’s studio managers, artist’s estate executives, artist-endowed foundation managers and board members, gallerists, and gallery/artist liaison managers, service providers for artists’ estates, art lawyers & tax advisors, and all those who have a stake in the art industry.

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Where works of art are involved, reliable data are indispensable –

  • appraisals
  • art experts and the courts
  • art insurance
  • artists’ estates and foundations
  • auction sales
  • authority to sell (title)
  • bankruptcy, creditors’ rights, and security interests in works of art
  • catalogues raisonnés
  • collateralization of art
  • consignment agreements
  • copyrights in works of art and reproductions of works of art
  • cultural patrimony laws
  • curating exhibitions
  • customs service regulations concerning the import and export of art
  • defamation and product defamation concerning works of art and their provenance
  • divorce and other family disputes
  • droit moral and the Visual Artists Rights Act
  • exhibition agreements
  • donor restrictions on use or display of donated works
  • import and export of art
  • International cultural treaties
  • Internet sites concerning art and art sales
  • investment management and financial planning
  • joint ownership of works of art
  • legal disputes over responsibility and ownership
  • loans for art buyers and dealers
  • loans and gifts of artwork to museums
  • looted and confiscated works of art from the Nazi era
  • lost and stolen works of art
  • misappropriation of artwork and design
  • monographs
  • Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act
  • private dealer sales
  • Presidential Commission on Holocaust Assets in the US

 

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Starting a new project? Already have data and wondering what to do next? Simply have a question? Email us at enquire@panopticondesign.net

The best way to fully grasp what our product can do is to see it in action. Fill out a form to request a demonstration. We can come to you if you are in New York City. If not, we can demonstrate our software online. We’ll show it to you wherever you are.

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Top: from left to right in descending order: Paul Cézanne (1839–1906) Still Life with Apples 1895-98, The Museum of Modern Art: Lillie P. Bliss Collection (22.1934); László Moholy-Nagy (1895–1946) Head (Lucia Moholy), c. 1926 The Museum of Modern Art: Anonymous gift (505.1939). © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn; Kay Sage (1898–1963) The Great Impossible 1961, The Museum of Modern Art: Kay Sage Tanguy Bequest (1132.1964); Peter Campus (1937– ), video installation created 1975, acquired 1993 SFMOMA: Accessions Committee Fund: gift of Barbara Bass Bakar, Doris and Donald Fisher, Pam and Dick Kramlich, Leanne B. Roberts, and Norah and Norman Stone. © Peter Campus; Eugen Schönebeck (1936– ), Untitled, pen and tusche on paper, 1962. Photo courtesy Galerie Judin, Berlin; Larry Bell (1939– ) Standing Walls (detail, from 6 X 6 an improvisation). Photo © Alex Marks, courtesy The Chinati Foundation, Marfa, TX; Fitz Henry Lane (1804–65) Lighthouse at Camden, Maine 1851. Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Conn., Gift of the Teresa and H. John Heinz III Foundation (1992.122.1). Photo: Yale University Art Gallery; Roy Lichtenstein (1923–97) Girl with Ball, 1961. The Museum of Modern Art: Gift of Philip Johnson. (421.1981); John Singer Sargent (1856–1925) The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit, 1882. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston: Gift of Mary Louisa Boit, Julia Overing Boit, Jane Hubbard Boit, and Florence D. Boit in memory of their father, Edward Darley Boit. Photo: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.