cataloging tools

Kay Sage Uses Our Tools


Kay Sage, I Have No Shadow (detail), 1940

the Kay Sage Catalogue Raisonné Project joins
a growing number who use panOpticon tools
to manage their content

The art of Kay Sage (1898–1963) belongs to a descriptive form of Surrealism, an art in which the scene is unreal, but the setting and the individual objects in it are painted with fidelity. Her paintings depict deserted expanses of sand or water painted in muted greens, grays and ochre. There are clear skies and bleak horizons. These desolate landscapes are populated by angular forms that suggest architectural scaffolding. Composed of piers, ladders, ribs, rigging, frames and lattice, they are skeletal structures, intricate and fragile. Delicately balanced towers appear unfinished, whether in process of being constructed, or in process of being destroyed, it is impossible to say for certain. Often, they are enlivened with flags and bits of torn drapery, the softness of the cloth contrasting with the constructions’ angularity. All is bathed in a bleaching, sulfurous light. Stillness and silence prevails. One can repeatedly return to Kay Sage’s paintings and never grow tired of contemplating their mystery and poetic intensity.

The Kay Sage Catalogue Raisonné will bring to fruition the meticulous work and scholarship of Stephen Robeson Miller. The objective is to produce a fully illustrated record of the artist’s ouevre, including comprehensive provenance, exhibition history, and publication history. Please visit www.kaysagecatalogue.com for additional details and contact information.

We at panOpticon are extremely proud that the Kay Sage Catalogue Raisonné Project chose our content management system.

Above: I Have No Shadow (detail), 1940
Oil on canvas
25 x 21 in. (63.5 x 53.3 cm)
Signed and dated lower right: “Kay Sage ’40″
Worcester Art Museum, Mass. Gift from the Estate of Kay Sage Tanguy (1964.31)

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panOpticon has developed innovative digital cataloging tools and a range of effective ways to make cultural content available for use online. And, thanks to our unique user interface, you can manage and publish everything yourself.

Whether you are an individual starting a catalogue from scratch, or an institution looking for a more robust product for your current data, we have a software package that will meet your needs.

The best way to understand what our tools can do is to see them at work — contact us to schedule a demonstration.

Check out our blog — catalog(ue) — a forum whose purpose is to help close the gap between traditional cataloging practices and the challenges we face when we use developing digital technologies to publish online.

Jan Brueghel Uses Our Tools


Jan Brueghel, Landscape with Tobias and the Angel (detail), c. 1595

the Jan Brueghel Drawings Catalogue Raisonné Project joins
the growing number who are using panOpticon tools
to manage their content

Approximately 500 drawings related to the oeuvre of the Flemish artist Jan I Brueghel the Elder (1568–1625) are preserved in public and private collections as well as in the art trade worldwide. Although he is a well known painter, his drawings have never before been considered in a complete and systematic way. Brueghel’s drawings are significant not only as independent works of art, but also as a treasure trove of source material for his paintings. They give us a unique view into his working methods that is invaluable to a complete study of the artist, who was a significant influence on the development of a number of diverse genres of painting in Antwerp during the 17th century. The large number of copies after these drawings show how much he was admired and how many artists visited his atelier and studied his work.

Authored by Drs. Teréz Gerszi and Louisa Wood Ruby with the assistance of Bernadett Tóth, this catalogue will allow scholars to analyze his significant contributions to the history of the genres of landscape, seascape, allegory and still life and be a useful source for all collectors, art galleries and auction houses interested in old master drawings. The authors are grateful to the Ernst von Siemens Stiftung, Munich for its financial support.

We at panOpticon are extremely proud that the Jan Brueghel Project has decided to use our content management system.

Above: Landscape with Tobias and the Angel (detail), c. 1595. Pen, brush, dark brown, light brown, and greyish-blue ink, 202 x 313 cm, Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest.

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panOpticon has developed innovative digital cataloging tools and a range of effective ways to make cultural content available for use online. And, thanks to our unique user interface, you manage and publish everything yourself.

Whether you are an individual starting a catalogue from scratch, or an institution looking for a more robust product for your current data, we have a software package that will meet your needs.

The best way to understand what our tools can do is to see them at work — contact us to schedule a demonstration.

Check out our blog — catalog(ue) — a forum whose purpose is to help close the gap between traditional cataloging practices and the challenges we face when we use developing digital technologies to publish online.

The Right Connections


[This month's featured catalog(ue) post, "Linked in," by Kirsten M. Jensen reveals how she is able to draw a larger audience to her catalogue's online content while expanding it's outward reach.]

John Folinsbee died in 1972, forgotten, for the most part, outside the confines of the artistic hamlet of New Hope, Pennsylvania, where he lived most of his adult life. Few remembered his forthright realism, the robust brushwork and color that enlivened his canvases, and the dramatic play of light and shadow that infused them with mood and atmosphere. Forty years later, an exhibition review in the New York Times, also published online, mentioned Queensboro Bridge by Folinsbee (included in the show), and linked to the artist’s online catalogue raisonné.

Catalogues raisonnés can do a lot to resurrect the life and work of an artist, but for the work to have continued relevance for contemporary audiences, links like these are increasingly important. The exponential explosion of data on the web can be dizzying, but for a scholar, or an editor of a catalogue raisonné, the availability of relevant and related materials can also be enriching. With the Exhibition and Literature features, for example, there are a number of ways that external content—exhibition reviews or articles, in the case of Folinsbee’s Queensboro Bridge—can be linked to a particular work, thereby broadening the scope in which it is considered. The painting was not illustrated in the Times review, but the link to the artist’s catalogue not only gave the interested reader an image to look at, but access to the more than 1600 documented works in the artist’s oeuvre, essays, and additional content. Conversely, a link from the online catalogue to the review further contextualizes his work by enabling the scholar to examine it alongside images of paintings by his peers. John Folinsbee, linked in.

Kirsten M. Jensen, PhD is Research Director & Editor of the online John F. Folisbee Catalogue Raisonné.

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The exhibition Industrial Sublime: Modernism and the Transformation of New York’s Rivers, 1900-1940, curated by Kirsten M. Jensen and Bartholomew F. Bland, will be at the Hudson River Museum from October 12, 2013–January 17, 2014.

Top of page: John F. Folinsbee, Queensboro Bridge (detail), 1917, oil on canvas, 32 x 40 in. (81.28 x 101.6 cm), private collection.

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panOpticon has developed a comprehensive set of digital cataloging tools and a range of effective ways to make cultural content available for use online. The best way to understand what the tools can do is to see them at work. Feel free to schedule a demonstration.

Edwin Dickinson Launched


Edwin Dickinson Estate Launches New Catalogue Raisonné Online

The American painter Edwin Dickinson (1891-1978) was born in Seneca Falls, New York, studied with William Merritt Chase and Charles W. Hawthorne and spent most of his working life on Cape Cod and in New York City. Helen Dickinson Baldwin, the artist’s daughter and author of the new online Edwin Dickinson Catalogue Raisonné writes, “Though others might consider his studios cluttered and crowded, for my father every object had an association which was for him nourishing, even inspiring.” [read more]

The design and production of the Edwin Dickinson Catalogue Raisonné is the result of a cooperative venture between Helen’s husband and designer Robert Baldwin, and the creative team at panOpticon who employed their innovative technical and design expertise in developing the software and creating the website.

panOpticon has developed a comprehensive set of digital cataloging tools and a range of effective ways to make cultural content available for use online. The best way to understand what the tools can do is to see them at work. Feel free to schedule a demonstration.

(above) Grey Jug and Half Lemon, 1915. Oil on canvas, 25 x 25 in. (63.5 x 63.5 cm). Collection Mr. and Mrs. Julian D. Anthony. Photo: Robert A. Baldwin.

Arshile Gorky Uses Our Tools


Arshile Gorky, The Betrothal, II (detail), 1947

the Arshile Gorky Foundation joins the
growing list of those now using pan
Opticon tools
to manage their catalogues raisonnés

The Armenian American artist Arshile Gorky (c.1902–48) was a seminal influence on post-war abstraction, “paint[ing] some of the most magnetic and heart-rending pictures of the 20th century.”*

The Arshile Gorky Foundation was established in 2005 to further the public’s appreciation and understanding of the life and achievements of this important artist. In December of the following year, the Foundation began compiling a database of Gorky’s paintings, sculptures, and works on paper.

We at panOpticon are extremely proud that the Foundation recently decided to move their data over to our content management system.

 

(above left) Arshile Gorky, The Betrothal, II (detail), 1947. Oil on canvas, 50 3/4 × 38 in. (128.9 × 96.5 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase 50.3 © 2010 The Arshile Gorky Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

*Holland Cotter. “From Mimic to Master of Invention,” The New York Times, October 22, 2009.

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panOpticon has developed innovative digital cataloging tools and a range of effective ways to make cultural content available for use online. And, thanks to our unique user interface, you manage and publish everything yourself.

Whether you are an individual starting a catalogue from scratch, or an institution looking for a more robust product for your current data, we have a software package that will meet your needs.

The best way to understand what our tools can do is to see them at work.
Contact us to schedule a demonstration.

Fitz Henry Lane in Progress


The Fitz Henry Lane Online Catalogue Project Continues to Garner Grants

panopticon is very pleased to play a role in The Fitz Henry Lane Online Catalogue Raisonné Project under the direction of the Cape Ann Museum in Gloucester, Massachusetts. The Project is at the heart of a $5M Capital Campaign—Reaching Out, Strengthening Within.

The Museum has already reached 70% of its goal in contributions and pledges and hopes to launch the Lane website in early 2014.

Funding for the Lane Project is provided by the Cape Ann Museum, the Wyeth Foundation for American Art, the Danversbank Charitable Foundation, and the John H. and H. Naomi Tomfohrde Foundation.

“We have had nothing but positive experiences with the panOpticon team. They have been very easy to work with, prompt and responsible in follow-through on all levels. The training is straightforward and the software itself can answer most questions going forward. Most importantly, the team understands the field of art scholarship as only insiders can. The amount of time and effort we have saved in the start-up phase alone is incalculable and the ongoing efficiency of the data input and organization continues to allow us to focus our resources on the core research.”

— Sam Holdsworth, Project Director, Fitz Henry Lane Catalogue Project

Learn more about this fascinating project.

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panopticon has developed an innovative content management system and a variety of effective ways to make cultural content available online — and thanks to our unique user interface you can manage and publish everything yourself.

Whether you are an individual starting a catalogue from scratch, or an institution looking for a more robust product for your current data, we have a software package that will meet your needs.

Contact us and schedule a demonstration — the best way to understand what our tools can do is to see them at work.

Above: Fitz Henry Lane, Brace’s Rock (detail),1864, oil on canvas, 10 x 15 in. (25.4 x 38.1 cm),
Cape Ann Historical Museum, Gloucester, Gift of Harold and Betty Bell, 2007.

John F. Folinsbee Launched


queensboroBr_2

The John F. Folinsbee Art Trust and panOpticon are pleased to announce the publication of the new online John F. Folinsbee Catalogue Raisonné.

The American landscape painter John Fulton Folinsbee (1892–1972) was best known for his impressionist scenes of the factories, quarries, bridges, and canals along the Delaware River. With little time or need for “isms,” Folinsbee filtered a broad array of stylistic influences, both traditional and contemporary, into a method of painting that was uniquely his own. It is the hope of the Trust that the online Catalogue Raisonné will foster a greater appreciation for Folinsbee’s work and re-place him in the canon of twentieth-century American art.

The Catalogue’s Research Director and Editor, Kirsten M. Jensen was asked to head up the project in 2004. “The idea to make the catalogue an online venture, rather than a print publication, intrigued me for the technical challenges it presented as well as the possibilities for making Folinsbee’s work more widely accessible—and sooner. Typical catalogues raisonnés take years before they are published, are expensive to produce and purchase, and are often outdated not long after ink hits the paper’s surface. The Web, however, provided us with the opportunity to change that paradigm, to make the catalogue of Folinsbee’s oeuvre immediately available to the public in a form that would be as current as possible.”

Among the many unusual features that gives the Folinsbee Catalogue special appeal is the number of instances where the user can view groups of related works, like the cloth-bound Sketchbook (1926) that Folinsbee filled on his trip through France. Select any of the thumbnails at the bottom of the page and click through a slideshow of all forty-three drawings.

The software and the website were developed for the Folinsbee Catalogue by the innovative team at panOpticon whose groundbreaking content management system is behind the catalogues raisonnés of Mary Cassatt, Paul Cézanne, Fitz Henry Lane, Roy Lichtenstein, and Jack Tworkov among others.

panOpticon is proud to play a role in this important project.

• Contact kjensen@folinsbee.org with questions about the Folinsbee Catalogue Raisonné.

Contact us with questions about the catalogue software.

Above: John F. Folinsbee, Queensboro Bridge, 1917, Oil on canvas, 32 x 40 in. (81.28 x 101.6 cm), Private collection.

Jack Tworkov Launched


The Estate of Jack Tworkov in collaboration with panOpticon is pleased to announce the publication of the online Catalogue Raisonné of Works on Canvas by Jack Tworkov. This is the first catalogue raisonné of its kind to be released free to the public on the web. Unlike traditional print versions of a catalogue raisonné, which typically go out of date the moment they are printed, the Tworkov Catalogue Raisonné is open-ended and on-going, continuing to accommodate new research.

Jack Tworkov (1900-1982) was a founding member of the New York School and is regarded as one of the prominent figures, along with Willem de Kooning, Philip Guston, Jackson Pollock, and Franz Kline, whose gestural paintings of the 1950s formed the basis for the abstract expressionist movement in America. With a career spanning five-decades, this new website highlights Tworkov’s historic presence and significant contribution to American Art of the 20th Century. In 2009 the artist’s writings were compiled and published in the book Extreme of the Middle: Writings of Jack Tworkov by Yale University Press.

The Tworkov Catalogue Raisonné is edited by Jason Andrew, who has been active with the Estate since 2004 and who was responsible for organizing and curating the first comprehensive retrospective exhibition of the artist’s work ever held in New York City in 2009. The project also benefits from the participation of the artist’s daughters, Hermine Ford and Helen Tworkov.

The online database is designed by the innovative team at panOpticon whose experience in the field of catalogue software design includes the catalogues raisonnés of Paul Cézanne, Mary Cassatt, Roy Lichtenstein, and Sam Francis to name a few.

Taking advantage of the ground-breaking features of the panOpticon content management system, Mr. Andrew worked with the design team at panOpticon to integrate nearly eight years of research seamlessly into the new catalogue raisonné which is housed within the framework of the Jack Tworkov website. The Jack Tworkov website is designed by Goingoffscript.

The first stage of the Tworkov Catalogue Raisonné Project features works on canvas with currently over 300 works online and growing. The goal is to eventually include all works made by the artist, including paintings, works on paper. The site will eventually add correspondence, audio and video recordings, and other documentation that will contribute to the definitive statement on Jack Tworkov.

The launch coincides with the 30th anniversary of the artist’s passing in 1982. The Jack Tworkov Catalogue Raisonné Project can be viewed here: www.jacktworkov.com.

panOpticon is proud to play a role in this important project.

The Estate of Jack Tworkov is represented by Mitchell-Innes & Nash, New York.

• Contact info@jacktworkov with questions about the Jack Tworkov site.

Contact us with questions about the catalogue software.

Above: Jack Tworkov, House of the Sun Variation, 1952, Oil on canvas, 39 x 35 in. (99 x 89 cm),
Private collection, New York.