cataloging

new Arthur Dove CR in print

Arthur Dove, Sunrise I, 1936

the transcendent catalogue raisonné Arthur Dove deserves

“The Arthur Dove Catalogue Raisonné Project, launched in early 2013, aims to build on and revise the earlier compendium of the artist’s work overseen by Ann Lee Morgan in 1984. After curating two major exhibitions featuring his work—Arthur Dove: A Retrospective (1997-98) and Dove/O’Keeffe: Circles of Influence (2009)—I knew firsthand that America’s foremost abstract artist of the early twentieth century required an updated catalogue that definitively chronicled his output as a painter. With Morgan’s volume as a foundation, I sought not only to add to her entries on Dove’s known corpus of paintings and assemblages, which he called “things,” but also to illustrate each work in color. For an artist who declared in 1930, midway through his career, that his primary interest was to capture the “condition of light” elusive within nature, this seemed essential. Black-and-white reproductions, after all, can hardly allude to the metaphysical properties and sensation of transcendence that lay at the heart of Dove’s aesthetic program.

“The format of any catalogue raisonné is inherently fixed, with its prescribed chronological listings, and thereby resists invention and variation. It must prove an inventory of excavated facts—ownership histories and transactions, as well as notable exhibitions—all to serve the scholar, student, collector, and dealer. As I saw it, part of my challenge was to relieve this serial structure through some modicum of vitality. My response has been to include an essay that ties Dove’s work to the critics who (mostly) bolstered his painting during his lifetime as well as a lengthy biographical timeline that traces his career and its intersections with relevant modernist developments and preoccupations. Additionally, I have written twenty-four short essays on paintings deemed to represent some of Dove’s monuments whose formal resolution and emotional uplift stretched the known territories of American abstraction before midcentury.”

– Debra Bricker Balken
Director, The Arthur Dove Catalogue Raisonné Project

Arthur Dove: A Catalogue Raisonné of Paintings and Things
by Debra Bricker Balken; with contributions by Jessie Sentivan
Distributed by Yale University Press for the Arthur Dove Catalogue Raisonné Project
ISBN: 9780300251654 Hardcover

“… the true revelation here lies in the full-color illustrations, which track the painter through his marvels and misfires alike.” — from “BOOKFORUM CONTRIBUTORS on this season’s notable art books,” BOOKFORUM MAR/APR/MAY 2021

Above: Sunrise I, 1936, oil and wax emulsion on canvas, 25 x 35 in. Collection of Deborah and Ed Shein

______________

panOpticon has developed innovative digital cataloging tools
and a range of effective ways to share cultural content with others.
And, thanks to our unique user interface, you can manage and publish everything yourself.

The best way to understand what our tools can do is to see them at work —
contact us to schedule a demonstration.

an amazing site – it takes a village

Fitz Henry Lane – Gloucester Harbor 1847 (detail)

A single website can make a significant contribution to the digital humanities

Fitz Henry Lane Online is a freely-accessible interactive and interdisciplinary online resource created by the Cape Ann Museum. The website is organized around a catalog of the paintings, drawings, and lithographs of nineteenth-century American painter Fitz Henry Lane (1804–1865). The Cape Ann Museum, located in Gloucester, Massachusetts (Lane’s birthplace and home for most of his life) has the world’s largest collection of Lane’s paintings, drawings, lithographs, and related archival material. The website is intended to provide information of interest to a broad audience, and to serve as a resource for study of Lane’s work. The website focuses on both the formal, aesthetic qualities and the historical context of Lane’s pictures.

“One of the advantages of an online resource is that new information can be added at any time. It is intended that this site will evolve as writers, historians, and art scholars pursue new research and use this site as a forum and important resource for the work of Fitz Henry Lane and the related art and history of mid-nineteenth-century New England.

“With funding from generous donors, early conservation and curatorial work by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and conservation work donated by the Cleveland Museum of Art, the website now includes hundreds of high-resolution images, including details and conservation (infrared, x-ray, and magnified) images; provenance records; selected exhibition and literature histories; annotated entries for key works; and extensive historical materials related to the subjects of Lane’s pictures. This project could not have been launched without the tireless contributions of project and Cape Ann Museum staff and the wide circle of advisors and volunteers who have so generously devoted their time and expertise, for which we are ever grateful.”

Sam Holdsworth
Fitz Henry Lane Online Project Director
“About the Project” (see the full article with list of staff, sponsors, and donors)

 

Above : Fitz Henry Lane. Gloucester Harbor (detail),1847. Oil on canvas, 28 1/2 x 41 in. (71.8 x 104.1 cm). Signed and dated lower right: F H Lane, 1847 [could have been FHL originally]. Cape Ann Museum, Gloucester, Mass., Gift of Estate of Samuel H. Mansfield, 1949 (1332.20). Photo: Cape Ann Museum

________

we are pleased that the Fitz Henry Lane Catalogue Raisonné project
chose panOpticon to power its online catalogue

scholarship builds on reliable data

an exemplary catalogue raisonné takes off online

The research files that support the Catalogue Raisonné of the Canadian painter
Tom Thomson (1877–1917) are available for consultation by appointment
at the Edward P. Taylor Library & Archives, Art Gallery of Ontario

“From 1970 on, I had the work of Thomson in private collections brought into the Art Gallery of Ontario to be photographed. In examining this material, and the Gallery collection of works by Thomson, I found myself fascinated with the inscriptions (often written by Dr. J.M. MacCallum, Thomson’s great patron and friend), on the backs of works and I began to believe they were important to the record. After I left the Gallery and became Director of The Robert McLaughlin Gallery in Oshawa from 1974 to 2000, and afterwards, I continued to record Thomson inscriptions and labels wherever I could, especially in works as they appeared at auction and in private collections. Even in 2009, incredibly it seemed to me, genuine Thomsons came my way to be recorded. Like every cataloguer who attempts omnipotence, the discovery of this work helped me realize my shortcomings. I would like to believe that I have included all the works by Tom Thomson that exist, but I realize that the field is open. New material will show up with time.”

Tom Thomson Catalogue Raison: Researched and written by Joan Murray

________

Above: Tom Thomson
Round Lake, Mud Bay
Fall 1915
Alternate titles: Geese, Round Lake, Mud Bay
Oil on wood
8 7/16 x 10 5/16 in. (21.5 x 26.2 cm)
Inscription recto: l.r., Tom Thomson / 15 (incised) Inscription verso: u.l., in ink, by Mrs. Frank Cooper, Round Lake, Mud Bay / Painted as the First Flock of of [sic] / Geese flew back from the South [crossed out] North / Painting By The World’s Best Artist / Tom Thomson “1915″ He was Drowned at / Algonquin park July 8th 1916 [sic]; incised on frame (in 1970); Cat. 86; label, Art Gallery of Toronto, J.S. McLean
Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto (L69.51)

 

________

we are pleased that the Tom Thomson Catalogue Raisonné project
has chosen panOpticon to power its online catalogue

19th century life in living color

Boatmen on the Missouri 1846

the George Caleb Bingham Catalogue Raisonné is launched

“George Caleb Bingham (1811-1879) is recognized today as one of the most important 19th century American artists. He is distinguished among the first generation of painters of the early American West for his classic narrative scenes drawn from his actual observation and experience.

“The primary goal of this project is to strengthen public and scholarly access to Bingham’s authenticated paintings and to ensure the lasting heritage of Missouri’s greatest 19th century artist, an artist who holds a high place among the pantheon of America’s enduring Old Masters. Each of Bingham’s nearly 600 paintings will be documented by a high-resolution color photograph, combined with each painting’s physical description, provenance, history of exhibitions, and full bibliography; and in the case of his many portraits, biographical and genealogical data will be included. Image-wise, this is a significant improvement in presentation over the predominantly black & white reproductions in the previously published 1986 edition.

“This new online Catalogue Raisonné builds on and reproduces, and in some cases updates and revises, the masterful scholarship developed over four decades by Professor of Art History E. Maurice Bloch (1925-1989). The Paintings of George Caleb Bingham: A Catalogue Raisonné, published in 1986 by University of Missouri Press. Since 2005, under the direction of distinguished art historian and Bingham scholar, Fred R. Kline, and supported by an advisory board of scholars, some 30 previously unknown and unnoticed paintings have been added to Bingham’s works—including many new discoveries, notably his first river-themed painting from 1841, Baiting the Hook. As Bingham did not sign most of his paintings, it is expected that future works will rise to the surface and be identified and added to this catalogue.

“This project is undertaken by the Riverbank Foundation, a 501(c)(3) organization created specifically to undertake the new Bingham Catalogue Raisonné and other future projects dealing with American art and art history.”

Above:
George Caleb Bingham
Boatmen on the Missouri
Oil on canvas
1846
25 x 30 in. (63.5 x 76.2 cm)
Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco – The de Young Museum

________

we are pleased that the George Caleb Bingham Catalogue Raisonné project
has chosen panOpticon to power its online catalogue

the ‘Painter of the National Parks’

Gunnar Widforss, Desert Vista, n.d.

Gunnar Widforss Catalogue Raisonné Launched

“Although Gunnar Widforss (1879–1934) was known as the ‘Painter of the National Parks’ in the United States in the 1920s and 1930s, very little art-historical writing or scholarship has been focused on the artist. His extraordinary paintings of western national parks in the United States and scenes of European and Swedish landscapes have suffered from decades of obscurity following his death in 1934. Throughout his career (1904–1934), Widforss swam against the powerful tide of modernism as tastes in art focused on the European avant-garde. His first significant exhibition in Stockholm in 1913, featuring landscape scenes of southern France and Capri, took place shortly after Picasso and Braque’s early period of experimental Cubism peaked, and it coincided with the intense artistic dialogue spawned by the 1913 Armory Show in New York.

“The Museum of Northern Arizona, located in Flagstaff, Arizona, currently has the largest collection of Widforss paintings, drawings, and related archival material, with twenty-two works of art in the fine art collection. The Museum’s relationship with the artist dates back to the late 1920s.

“The catalogue raisonné is a comprehensive catalogue of all of Widforss’ work known at this time. At the date of publication (September 2020), the catalogue includes over 1,200 works from private and public collections, and many for which the present location is unknown. As research continues, works will be added and information updated.”

Above:
Gunnar Widforss, Desert Vistan.d.
Watercolor
13 1/4 x 20 3/4 in. (33.7 x 52.7 cm)
Signed lower left: Widforss
Northern Arizona University Art Museum, Flagstaff, Arizona

________

we are pleased that the Gunnar Widforss Catalogue Raisonné project
has chosen panOpticon to power its online catalogue

art in the time of pandemic

.

the Cape Ann Museum in Gloucester, Massachusetts is currently closed due to the COVID-19 emergency

in the meantime, CAM invites you to discover Fitz Henry Lane Online
a freely-accessible, interactive, and interdisciplinary online resource created with the help of panOpticon

.

. 

________

Above: Fitz Henry Lane. Brace’s Rock. 1864. Oil on canvas. 10 x 15 in. (25.4 x 38.1 cm). No inscription found. Cape Ann Museum, Gloucester, Mass., Gift of Harold and Betty Bell, 2007 (2007.10).

.

Sam Francis Online CR Launched

A new “living catalogue raisonné” embraces the creative spirit of Sam Francis

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 18, 2018
MEDIA CONTACT
Brianna Smyk Reder
BriannaSmykReder@gmail.com
415.214.4144

On April 18th the Sam Francis Foundation released the inaugural stage of Sam Francis: Online Catalogue Raisonné Project – Unique Works on Paper and Expanded Version of Canvas and Panel Paintings 1945–1949.

“One of the twentieth century’s leading interpreters of light and color, American artist Sam Francis (1923–1994) was one of the first post-World War II painters to develop an international reputation. A truly international artist, he maintained studios in Bern, New York, Los Angeles, Paris, and Tokyo, and his work references New York Abstract Expressionism, Color Field Painting, Chinese and Japanese art, French Impressionism, and his own Bay Area roots. Francis created thousands of paintings as well as works on paper, prints, and monotypes, which are housed in major museum collections and institutions around the world.”

“SFCR is an interactive digital platform that presents for the first time unique works on paper and new information compiled by Editor Debra Burchett-Lere, Project Manager Beth Ann Whittaker, Contributors Leila Elliott and Stephanie Velazquez, and a team of photography editors, who have conducted extensive research with the Sam Francis Foundation’s in-house archives as well as the Getty Research Institute’s holdings. Embracing the artist’s creative and innovative spirit, the “living catalogue raisonné” will be amended regularly, both with new entries and with updates to existing pages, which will be time-stamped as they are modified.”

“We are thrilled to launch this first volume of Sam Francis’s digital catalogue raisonné, SFCR, which highlights the latest and most exhaustive research on the artist available to anyone, anywhere,” says Debra Burchett-Lere, Director of the Sam Francis Foundation. “It furthers the Foundation’s mission as it enables the international audience, to whom Francis was so significant, to access his vast oeuvre and learn new information about him as it is being discovered.”

Above:
SFF4.61 (Francis Archive SF48-002)
Untitled [Berkeley] 1948
Watercolor on paper
48.26 x 65.41 cm (19 x 25 3/4 in.)
INSCRIPTIONS: Reported to be signed, dated and inscribed in pencil on verso: Sam Francis 1948 Berkeley
ADDITIONAL NOTATIONS: Notated by studio assistant with the Litho Shop identification number and
an inventory number on blond wood frame verso: SF48-002 S4-33G
Stamped with the Sam Francis Estate logo stamp on verso
CREATION LOCATION: San Francisco Bay Area (Berkeley)
COLLECTION: Collection of Judith Ann Corrente, New York

________

We at panOpticon are extremely proud that the Sam Francis Online Catalogue Raisonné Project uses our unique information management system to power it’s online project.

Starting a catalogue raisonné project? Already have data and wondering what to do next? Simply have a question? Email us at enquire@panopticondesign.net.

The best way to fully grasp what our product can do is to see it in action. Fill out a form to request a demonstration. We can come to you if you are in New York City. If not, we can demonstrate our software online. We’ll show it to you wherever you are.

Paul Cézanne in his studio at Les Lauves

How to keep an artist’s work alive? — choose the right online tool

The Artist Estate: A Handbook for Artists, Executors, and Heirs, is a must read for artists, their family members and their heirs, artist’s studio managers, artist’s estate executives, artist-endowed foundation managers and board members, gallerists, and gallery/artist liaison managers, service providers for artists’ estates, art lawyers & tax advisors, and all those who have a stake in the industry.

Edited by Loretta Würtenberger, co-founder of The Institute for Artists’ Estates in Berlin, this invaluable book offers “appropriate financial models, possible legal frameworks, as well as advice on how to properly handle the art market, museums, and academia.” A whole chapter entitled “How to Keep an Artist’s Work Alive?” is devoted to the catalogue raisonné enterprise.

“Whether it provides an overview of the artist’s oeuvre in digital or print form, a catalogue raisonné establishes the fundamental categories of the art in the catalogue, as well as influences the way we discuss the art. Because it creates value, the originators and editors also carry a great ethical responsibility. In order to maintain the integrity of the artist and the authenticity of his or her work, the meticulous scholarly assessment must be carried out independent of any financial interests. As a ‘register of reason,’ the work on the catalogue raisonné requires diligence more than intellectual brilliance,” remarks the art historian Anette Tietenberg, who works in Braunschweig. Yet the catalogue raisonné also requires more than organizational abilities, as it must harness ‘the power of facts to ensure its future relevance.’

“Today, a catalogue raisonné should be digitized; it almost goes without saying that online databases can be expanded and updated easily. Moreover, the scope of the online catalogue raisonné should encompass the following:

1. Links to internal archival material
2. Links to documentation such as checklists and exhibition photographs
3. The integration of video and audio materials
4. The possibility of incorporating negative or inconclusive results, so that the limits of previous research are well understood
5. Links to external sources such as archival holdings and press articles or other publications, as well as public search engines and databases.

“… it is also imperative to select a database that can be used internally, but also provides a module for web publishing. Among other things, this module then helps determine which sets of information developed for internal use should be published online and for whom. [The New York archivist Caroline] Gabrielli recommends asking at the outset: Who should have full access to the catalogue raisonne? Should access only be local or should it be published on the web? Does the technology allow necessary information to be linked? How much does this particular solution cost? Does it necessitate ongoing technical support, or must separate IT providers be brought on?”

Now, take a look at the best example out there, bar none: The The Paintings, Watercolors and Drawings of Paul Cezanne: An online catalogue raisonné under the direction of Walter Feilchenfeldt, Jayne Warman and David Nash.

________

Whether you are starting a catalogue raisonné from scratch, or looking for a more robust product for your current data, panOpticon has a package that will meet your exact needs.

   ”The Estate of David Smith is currently using panOpticon for our catalogue raisonné and archives databases and for more general inventory purposes.
“Although we don’t plan to publish the David Smith Sculpture catalogue raisonné online (it will be published as a three-volume book, by Yale University Press), we may decide post-publication to turn on the public-facing features of our panOpticon database in order to share updates and new finds.
“We’ve found panOpticon to be a remarkably good partner, working with us to migrate the data from our old system, and willing to add features and customize aspects of the basic panOpticon system so we could make it work well for our particular needs.”

 — Susan Cooke
Associate Director / The Estate of David Smith
David Smith Catalogue Raisonné

Contact us to schedule a demonstration.

________

Above: Paul Cézanne in his studio at Les Lauves, in front of the Large Bathers now at the Barnes Foundation. Photo by Émile Bernard, 1904.

Thomas Hart Benton + panOpticon

Thomas Hart Benton. Instruments of Power, 1908

the Thomas Hart Benton catalogue raisonné project uses panOpticon tools

Born in 1889 in Neosho, Missouri, Thomas Hart Benton chose to follow a career in art, rather than politics, where his father and great-uncle, for whom he was named, had achieved prominence. Benton went to Chicago at age 19, studying at the Art Institute of Chicago for two years before going to Paris. There he encountered the work of artists such as Cézanne and Matisse, and the work of the cubists and synchronists, a group of painters who emphasized color as the means of creating form and energetic movement in their canvases. Moving to New York in 1913, Benton was producing paintings that displayed the principles of modernism he absorbed in Paris.

Benton continued to paint in a modernist mode until 1918, when he served as a draftsman in the U.S. Navy during World War I. Spending two years drawing realistic sketches and illustrations affected his style so profoundly that Benton abandoned modernism in favor of a more naturalistic depiction of his subjects, primarily American scenes. Between 1920 and 1924, he journeyed through the South and Midwest, drawing and painting the scenes he observed. By the end of the decade, his art was focused entirely on America and its people, and Benton became a leading American Regionalist artist, rejecting modernism as “foreign.” Using dramatic contrasts of dark and light and strong, mobile forms, his canvases burst with energy. These vigorous works mainly celebrate regional, small-town life, but his subjects also include Biblical and mythological scenes, often populated by what were regarded as typical American figures.

In 1935, Benton moved to Kansas City, Missouri, where he spent the rest of his life, painting and teaching for many years at the Kansas City Art Institute. Benton’s art was well known for both its power and populist viewpoint, and he received numerous commissions for murals for public buildings, ranging from museums, to the Missouri State Capitol, to the Truman Library in Independence, Missouri. He had just completed a mural for the Country Music Foundation in Nashville, Tennessee, at the time of his death in 1975.

— Biography © American Art @ The Phillips Collection

Above: Thomas Hart Benton. Instruments of Power, one of ten panels from America Today, 1930–31. Egg tempera with oil glazing over Permalba on a gesso ground on linen mounted to wood with a honeycomb interior. The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Gift of AXA Equitable, 2012 (2012.478a). Photo courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art. On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 909.

________

We at panOpticon are extremely proud that the Thomas Hart Benton catalogue raisonné project uses our information management system.

Starting a catalogue raisonné project? Already have data and wondering what to do next? Simply have a question? Email us at enquire@panopticondesign.net.

The best way to fully grasp what our product can do is to see it in action. Fill out a form to request a demonstration. We can come to you if you are in New York City. If not, we can demonstrate our software online. We’ll show it to you wherever you are.

follow us on Instagram

Willard Metcalf Uses Our Tools


Willard Metcalf. Garden of Dreams, 1908

The Willard Metcalf catalogue raisonné project uses panOpticon tools

“Willard L. Metcalf (1858–1925), born of working-class parents in Lowell, Massachusetts, studied in Boston at age seventeen with landscapist George Loring Brown and later worked at the museum school. Financial success as a book and magazine illustrator enabled him to travel to Paris and study at the Académie Julian under the conservative tutelage of Boulanger. In 1886 he was the first American painter to spend time at Giverny within the aura of Monet impressionists, but the new style seems to have had little effect on him.

“Returning home he spent several years as a portraitist and illustrator and taught many seasons at the Cooper Institute in New York. During these years he led a fitful personal life, with broken marriages and a record of alcoholism. In 1904 he withdrew from society and spent a year in the Maine woods, thinking, painting, and ‘drying out’. The effect was revelatory and gave fresh direction and motivation to his efforts. He called it his “Impressionist Renaissance,” and he became dedicated to painting the New England landscape with more vibrant, expressive brushwork and a more colorful palette.

“Now one of the Ten American Painters, he joined Childe Hassam at Old Lyme, Connecticut, for several years, moving the participants in that community from a tonalist to a more impressionist style. Several seasons were spent with the Cornish, New Hampshire, colony but generally he roamed throughout the New England countryside painting its splendors winter and summer. The “poet laureate” of the New England hills became his popular cognomen. Working often within an unconventional square format, he painted broad, light-filled, delicately colored views of the hills and villages of New England.”

— Smithsonian American Art Museum

Above: Willard Metcalf. Garden of Dreams, 1908. Oil on canvas, 24 x 24 in. (61 x 61 cm). Signed and dated lower left: W. L Metcalf 1908. Private collection, Pennsylvania.

________

We at panOpticon are extremely proud that the Willard Metcalf catalogue raisonné project uses our content management system.

Whether you are starting a catalogue from scratch, or looking for a more robust product for your current data, panOpticon has a software package that will meet your needs. Contact us to schedule a demonstration.