Legacy

19th century life in living color

Boatmen on the Missouri 1846

the George Caleb Bingham Catalogue Raisonné is launched

“George Caleb Bingham (1811-1879) is recognized today as one of the most important 19th century American artists. He is distinguished among the first generation of painters of the early American West for his classic narrative scenes drawn from his actual observation and experience.

“The primary goal of this project is to strengthen public and scholarly access to Bingham’s authenticated paintings and to ensure the lasting heritage of Missouri’s greatest 19th century artist, an artist who holds a high place among the pantheon of America’s enduring Old Masters. Each of Bingham’s nearly 600 paintings will be documented by a high-resolution color photograph, combined with each painting’s physical description, provenance, history of exhibitions, and full bibliography; and in the case of his many portraits, biographical and genealogical data will be included. Image-wise, this is a significant improvement in presentation over the predominantly black & white reproductions in the previously published 1986 edition.

“This new online Catalogue Raisonné builds on and reproduces, and in some cases updates and revises, the masterful scholarship developed over four decades by Professor of Art History E. Maurice Bloch (1925-1989). The Paintings of George Caleb Bingham: A Catalogue Raisonné, published in 1986 by University of Missouri Press. Since 2005, under the direction of distinguished art historian and Bingham scholar, Fred R. Kline, and supported by an advisory board of scholars, some 30 previously unknown and unnoticed paintings have been added to Bingham’s works—including many new discoveries, notably his first river-themed painting from 1841, Baiting the Hook. As Bingham did not sign most of his paintings, it is expected that future works will rise to the surface and be identified and added to this catalogue.

“This project is undertaken by the Riverbank Foundation, a 501(c)(3) organization created specifically to undertake the new Bingham Catalogue Raisonné and other future projects dealing with American art and art history.”

Above:
George Caleb Bingham
Boatmen on the Missouri
Oil on canvas
1846
25 x 30 in. (63.5 x 76.2 cm)
Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco – The de Young Museum

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we are pleased that the George Caleb Bingham Catalogue Raisonné project
has chosen panOpticon to power its online catalogue

the ‘Painter of the National Parks’

Gunnar Widforss, Desert Vista, n.d.

Gunnar Widforss Catalogue Raisonné Launched

“Although Gunnar Widforss (1879–1934) was known as the ‘Painter of the National Parks’ in the United States in the 1920s and 1930s, very little art-historical writing or scholarship has been focused on the artist. His extraordinary paintings of western national parks in the United States and scenes of European and Swedish landscapes have suffered from decades of obscurity following his death in 1934. Throughout his career (1904–1934), Widforss swam against the powerful tide of modernism as tastes in art focused on the European avant-garde. His first significant exhibition in Stockholm in 1913, featuring landscape scenes of southern France and Capri, took place shortly after Picasso and Braque’s early period of experimental Cubism peaked, and it coincided with the intense artistic dialogue spawned by the 1913 Armory Show in New York.

“The Museum of Northern Arizona, located in Flagstaff, Arizona, currently has the largest collection of Widforss paintings, drawings, and related archival material, with twenty-two works of art in the fine art collection. The Museum’s relationship with the artist dates back to the late 1920s.

“The catalogue raisonné is a comprehensive catalogue of all of Widforss’ work known at this time. At the date of publication (September 2020), the catalogue includes over 1,200 works from private and public collections, and many for which the present location is unknown. As research continues, works will be added and information updated.”

Above:
Gunnar Widforss, Desert Vistan.d.
Watercolor
13 1/4 x 20 3/4 in. (33.7 x 52.7 cm)
Signed lower left: Widforss
Northern Arizona University Art Museum, Flagstaff, Arizona

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we are pleased that the Gunnar Widforss Catalogue Raisonné project
has chosen panOpticon to power its online catalogue

Feininger Catalogue Launched

Portrait of Lyonel Feininger 1932

A new online Catalogue Raisonné pays tribute to Lyonel Feininger

Born in New York City in 1871, Lyonel Feininger moved to Berlin in 1887 where he studied at the Royal Academy of Arts. His paintings were included in the Salon des Indépendants in Paris in 1911, and the Erster Deutscher Herbstsalon in Berlin in 1913. In 1917 Galerie Der Sturm in Berlin mounted his first solo exhibition.

Walter Gropius appointed Feininger as one of the first masters at the Staatliches Bauhaus in Weimar in May 1919, where he served as master of form in the printing workshop from 1919 to 1925. His woodcut Cathedral was used to illustrate the cover of the Bauhaus Manifesto of 1919.

In 1931 Feininger retrospectives were held in Dresden, Essen, and at the Nationalgalerie in Berlin. Soon thereafter, the National Socialists declared his art “degenerate,” and in 1937 he moved back to his native New York where he continued to work until his death in 1956.

Lyonel Feininger: The Catalogue Raisonné of Paintings by Achim Moeller was officially launched June 15, 2018. This first installment includes the basic details of those paintings created between 1907 and 1918. The Catalogue also includes a chronology and an exhaustive list of exhibitions and publications pertaining to Feininger.

This beautiful online catalogue will continue to be updated on a regular basis—it is a work in progress. Additional, more extensive information related to individual paintings, including provenance, exhibition histories, and references in literature, is available upon request through the catalogue.

The overall look and typographic style of Lyonel Feininger: The Catalogue Raisonné of Paintings is the work of the French graphic designer Philippe Apeloig. A longstanding member of the Alliance Graphique Internationale, Apeloig has created the visual identities for numerous international art institutions, including the Direction des Musées de France, the Institut National d’Histoire de l’Art, and the Instituto Universitario di Architettura di Venezia.

In addition to The Catalogue Raisonné of Paintings, the Lyonel Feininger Project is currently preparing The Catalogue Raisonné of Drawings and Watercolors, by Achim Moeller and Sebastian Ehlert, and The Catalogue Raisonné of Graphic Works, by Sebastian Ehlert.

Above: Portrait of Lyonel Feininger, inscribed on verso: Taken in my studio at Dessau, in front of a painting on the easel, 1932.

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we are pleased that the Lyonel Feininger Project
chose panOpticon to power it’s online catalogue raisonné

Sam Francis Online CR Launched

A new “living catalogue raisonné” embraces the creative spirit of Sam Francis

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 18, 2018
MEDIA CONTACT
Brianna Smyk Reder
BriannaSmykReder@gmail.com
415.214.4144

On April 18th the Sam Francis Foundation released the inaugural stage of Sam Francis: Online Catalogue Raisonné Project – Unique Works on Paper and Expanded Version of Canvas and Panel Paintings 1945–1949.

“One of the twentieth century’s leading interpreters of light and color, American artist Sam Francis (1923–1994) was one of the first post-World War II painters to develop an international reputation. A truly international artist, he maintained studios in Bern, New York, Los Angeles, Paris, and Tokyo, and his work references New York Abstract Expressionism, Color Field Painting, Chinese and Japanese art, French Impressionism, and his own Bay Area roots. Francis created thousands of paintings as well as works on paper, prints, and monotypes, which are housed in major museum collections and institutions around the world.”

“SFCR is an interactive digital platform that presents for the first time unique works on paper and new information compiled by Editor Debra Burchett-Lere, Project Manager Beth Ann Whittaker, Contributors Leila Elliott and Stephanie Velazquez, and a team of photography editors, who have conducted extensive research with the Sam Francis Foundation’s in-house archives as well as the Getty Research Institute’s holdings. Embracing the artist’s creative and innovative spirit, the “living catalogue raisonné” will be amended regularly, both with new entries and with updates to existing pages, which will be time-stamped as they are modified.”

“We are thrilled to launch this first volume of Sam Francis’s digital catalogue raisonné, SFCR, which highlights the latest and most exhaustive research on the artist available to anyone, anywhere,” says Debra Burchett-Lere, Director of the Sam Francis Foundation. “It furthers the Foundation’s mission as it enables the international audience, to whom Francis was so significant, to access his vast oeuvre and learn new information about him as it is being discovered.”

Above:
SFF4.61 (Francis Archive SF48-002)
Untitled [Berkeley] 1948
Watercolor on paper
48.26 x 65.41 cm (19 x 25 3/4 in.)
INSCRIPTIONS: Reported to be signed, dated and inscribed in pencil on verso: Sam Francis 1948 Berkeley
ADDITIONAL NOTATIONS: Notated by studio assistant with the Litho Shop identification number and
an inventory number on blond wood frame verso: SF48-002 S4-33G
Stamped with the Sam Francis Estate logo stamp on verso
CREATION LOCATION: San Francisco Bay Area (Berkeley)
COLLECTION: Collection of Judith Ann Corrente, New York

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We at panOpticon are extremely proud that the Sam Francis Online Catalogue Raisonné Project uses our unique information management system to power it’s online project.

Starting a catalogue raisonné project? Already have data and wondering what to do next? Simply have a question? Email us at enquire@panopticondesign.net.

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Paul Cézanne in his studio at Les Lauves

How to keep an artist’s work alive? — choose the right online tool

The Artist Estate: A Handbook for Artists, Executors, and Heirs, is a must read for artists, their family members and their heirs, artist’s studio managers, artist’s estate executives, artist-endowed foundation managers and board members, gallerists, and gallery/artist liaison managers, service providers for artists’ estates, art lawyers & tax advisors, and all those who have a stake in the industry.

Edited by Loretta Würtenberger, co-founder of The Institute for Artists’ Estates in Berlin, this invaluable book offers “appropriate financial models, possible legal frameworks, as well as advice on how to properly handle the art market, museums, and academia.” A whole chapter entitled “How to Keep an Artist’s Work Alive?” is devoted to the catalogue raisonné enterprise.

“Whether it provides an overview of the artist’s oeuvre in digital or print form, a catalogue raisonné establishes the fundamental categories of the art in the catalogue, as well as influences the way we discuss the art. Because it creates value, the originators and editors also carry a great ethical responsibility. In order to maintain the integrity of the artist and the authenticity of his or her work, the meticulous scholarly assessment must be carried out independent of any financial interests. As a ‘register of reason,’ the work on the catalogue raisonné requires diligence more than intellectual brilliance,” remarks the art historian Anette Tietenberg, who works in Braunschweig. Yet the catalogue raisonné also requires more than organizational abilities, as it must harness ‘the power of facts to ensure its future relevance.’

“Today, a catalogue raisonné should be digitized; it almost goes without saying that online databases can be expanded and updated easily. Moreover, the scope of the online catalogue raisonné should encompass the following:

1. Links to internal archival material
2. Links to documentation such as checklists and exhibition photographs
3. The integration of video and audio materials
4. The possibility of incorporating negative or inconclusive results, so that the limits of previous research are well understood
5. Links to external sources such as archival holdings and press articles or other publications, as well as public search engines and databases.

“… it is also imperative to select a database that can be used internally, but also provides a module for web publishing. Among other things, this module then helps determine which sets of information developed for internal use should be published online and for whom. [The New York archivist Caroline] Gabrielli recommends asking at the outset: Who should have full access to the catalogue raisonne? Should access only be local or should it be published on the web? Does the technology allow necessary information to be linked? How much does this particular solution cost? Does it necessitate ongoing technical support, or must separate IT providers be brought on?”

Now, take a look at the best example out there, bar none: The The Paintings, Watercolors and Drawings of Paul Cezanne: An online catalogue raisonné under the direction of Walter Feilchenfeldt, Jayne Warman and David Nash.

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   ”The Estate of David Smith is currently using panOpticon for our catalogue raisonné and archives databases and for more general inventory purposes.
“Although we don’t plan to publish the David Smith Sculpture catalogue raisonné online (it will be published as a three-volume book, by Yale University Press), we may decide post-publication to turn on the public-facing features of our panOpticon database in order to share updates and new finds.
“We’ve found panOpticon to be a remarkably good partner, working with us to migrate the data from our old system, and willing to add features and customize aspects of the basic panOpticon system so we could make it work well for our particular needs.”

 — Susan Cooke
Associate Director / The Estate of David Smith
David Smith Catalogue Raisonné

Contact us to schedule a demonstration.

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Above: Paul Cézanne in his studio at Les Lauves, in front of the Large Bathers now at the Barnes Foundation. Photo by Émile Bernard, 1904.

Moholy-Nagy at LACMA


László Moholy-Nagy and Lucia Moholy Untitled 1925

Moholy-Nagy: Future Present

Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)    February 12 – June 18, 2017

The first comprehensive retrospective of the work of László Moholy-Nagy (1895–1946) to appear in the United States in nearly fifty years, this long overdue presentation reveals a utopian artist who believed that art could work hand-in-hand with technology for the betterment of humanity. The exhibition presents an unparalleled opportunity to examine the career of this pioneering painter, photographer, sculptor, and filmmaker as well as graphic, exhibition, and stage designer, who was also an influential teacher at the Bauhaus, a prolific writer, and later the founder of Chicago’s Institute of Design. Among his radical innovations were experimentation with cameraless photography; the use of industrial materials in painting and sculpture; research with light, transparency, and movement; work at the forefront of abstraction; and the fluidity with which he moved between the fine and applied arts. The exhibition includes more than 300 collages, drawings, ephemera, films, paintings, photograms, photographs, photomontages, and sculptures, including works from public and private collections across Europe and the United States, some of which have never before been shown publicly in the U.S. Also on display is the ‘Room of the Present,’ a contemporary fabrication of an exhibition space originally conceived by Moholy-Nagy in 1930. It includes photographic reproductions, films, slides, and replicas of architecture, theater and industrial design including a 2006 replica of his kinetic ‘Light Prop for an Electric Stage’ (1930). Though never realized during his lifetime, ‘The Room of the Present’ illustrates Moholy’s belief in the power of images and various means by which to view them—a highly relevant paradigm in today’s constantly shifting and evolving technological world.

Above: László Moholy-Nagy. Room of the Present (Raum der Gegenwart), constructed in 2009 from plans and other documentation dated 1930 Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven © 2016 Hattula Moholy-Nagy/VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York Photo: Peter Cox, courtesy Art Resource, New York.

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We at panOpticon are extremely proud that the Moholy-Nagy catalogue raisonné project uses our content management system.

Whether you are starting a catalogue from scratch, or looking for a more robust product for your current data, panOpticon has a software package that will meet your needs. Contact us to schedule a demonstration.

Protect the Legacy Now


The Artist Legacy

Artists should plan early on to protect their heirs along with their legacies

“Artists frequently die before having organized their work, creating both difficulty in ascertaining how to distribute the pieces (to heirs, museums, etc.) and also allowing for the possibility of authenticity disputes. Creating a catalogue [raisonné] is something artists should avoid leaving to their senior years, according to [Loretta] Würtenberger.* ‘The more specific thoughts an artist develops during their lifetime, the easier it is later,’ she says, citing a recent conversation she had with an artist in his late forties who is represented by a large gallery and produces very technical art. ‘He is asking us to structure the whole question of a database for his studio.’ That database will become a resource for questions of authenticity as well as serving as a repository for the artist’s technical know-how—something that’s useful even while the artist is alive. ‘It’s interesting how somebody of our generation is already thinking about the posthumous phase,” she says, “and how these thoughts have consequences for what he’s doing today.’”

— from an Artsy editorial: “What Artists Should Do to Protect Their Legacies before Dying.”

*Loretta Würtenberger, co-founder of the newly launched Institute for Artists’ Estates in Berlin, is a contributor to the book The Artist Estate: A Handbook for Artists, Executors, and Heirs.

“Adam Sheffer, president of the Art Dealers Association of America [ADAA], says that talking to artists about estate planning and archiving is now a ‘standard part of the dialogue’ at many galleries. ‘When you begin a career and you start to have work enter the market, you have to think about everything as specific as archiving, as keeping extremely careful records, because down the road when it comes to the value of your foundation and issues around authenticity, the earlier you start the better,’ he says.”

— from the Financial Times, “How an artist’s legacy became big business,” August 26, 2016.

Above : David Smith, Tanktotem IV, 1953, 7/29/53, 1953, and Tanktotem III, 1953, Bolton Landing Dock, Lake George, New York, photo by the artist, c. 1953. Gelatin silver print, sheet size: 8 x 10 in. (20.3 x 25.4 cm).
© Estate of David Smith / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

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Whether you are starting a catalogue raisonné from scratch, or looking for a more robust product for your current data, panOpticon has a package that will meet your needs. Contact us to schedule a demonstration.