publishing

Fitz Henry Lane Launched


Fitz Henry Lane

News Release: Fitz Henry Lane Online

GLOUCESTER, MA – The Cape Ann Museum is pleased to announce the public launch of its
interactive website, Fitz Henry Lane Online, on February 15, 2016. Fitz Henry Lane (1804-1865) is regarded as one of the masters of 19th century American painting. This innovative online resource is comprised of several components including: a catalog of Lane’s paintings, drawings, and lithographs; an extensive database of historical information, images, and materials related to the subjects within Lane’s pictures; new scholarly essays; and a bibliography and archive of publications. The rich historical material is connected to the relevant paintings through easily clickable links. The 319 works currently on the site include all known Lane pictures in public collections. The Cape Ann Museum holds the single largest collection of Lane’s works, and the Museum hopes that this website will function as a central repository for information about Lane and a key resource for anyone (student, scholar, or museum visitor) interested in 19th century American art or history.

According to Project Director Sam Holdsworth:

A primary goal of the site is to highlight the marriage of Lane’s extraordinary attention to the details of the scenes he depicted with the formal aesthetics and sheer beauty of his artistic accomplishment. Almost every work tells a multi-layered story about the evolution of the maritime world of coastal New England as well as tracks his progression as an artist from the specific to the ephemeral as his work matured.

The project will continue to expand to include Lane paintings from private collections and additional scholarly essays and historical materials. Owners of Lane pictures, and individuals with information about Lane works, are encouraged to contact the project using the online form or completing the object information and submission agreement forms:
www.fitzhenrylaneonline.org/submission/

In conjunction with the website, the Museum is organizing a special exhibition of Lane’s lithographs featuring works from its permanent collection and those borrowed from other institutions. This wiil be the first time many of Lane’s lithographs will be shown together. Drawn on Stone: The Lithographs of Fitz Henry Lane will open on October 7, 2017 and run through March 4,2018. An illustrated catalog will accompany the exhibition and a symposium is scheduled for October 27-28, 2017.

The Cape Ann Museum, located in the heart of Gloucester, MA, celebrates the art, history and culture of Cape Ann—a region with a rich and varied culture of nationally significant historical,
industrial and artistic achievement. The Museum’s collections include fine art from the 19th century to the present, artifacts from the fishing & maritime and granite quarrying industries, textiles, furniture, a library/archives, and two historic houses. For more information visit:
www.capeannmuseum.org.

This project has been produced by the Cape Ann Museum with funds raised in its recent capital campaign and with major support provided by the Wyeth Foundation for American Art, the
National Endowment for the Arts, and the Institute ofMuseum and Library Services. Additional funding was received from the Danversbank Charitable Foundation and the John H. and H. Naomi Tomfohrde Foundation. The Cleveland Museum of Art contributed conservation studies
and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston provided curatorial and conservation assistance.

The website design and database software are by panOpticon.

Above : Fitz Henry Lane, Gloucester Harbor from Rocky Neck, 1844. Oil on canvas 34 x 45 3/4 in. (86.4 x 116.2 cm) Signed and dated lower right: “F H Lane, 1844.” Cape Ann Museum, Gloucester, Mass., Gift of Mrs. Jane Parker Stacy (Mrs. George O. Stacy), 1948 (1289.1a)

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Joaquín Torres-García at MoMA


Construction in White and Black, 1938. Torres-García in his Montevideo studio, c.1939

Joaquín Torres-García: The Arcadian Modern

The Museum of Modern Art New York October 25, 2015 – February 15, 2016

This major retrospective of Joaquín Torres-García (Uruguayan, 1874–1949) features works ranging from the late 19th century to the 1940s, including drawings, paintings, objects, sculptures, and original artist notebooks and rare publications. The exhibition combines a chronological display with a thematic approach, structured in a series of major chapters in the artist’s career, with emphasis on two key moments: the period from 1923 to 1933, when Torres-García participated in various European early modern avant-garde movements while establishing his own signature pictographic/Constructivist style; and 1935 to 1943, when, having returned to Uruguay, he produced one of the most striking repertoires of synthetic abstraction.

Torres-García is one of the most complex and important artists of the first half of the 20th century, and his work opened up transformational paths for modern art on both sides of the Atlantic. His personal involvement with a significant number of early avant-garde movements—from Catalan Noucentismo to Cubism, Ultraism-Vibrationism, and Neo-Plasticism—makes him an unparalleled figure whose work is ripe for a fresh critical reappraisal in the U.S.

Find out more about this remarkable artist through the Joaquín Torres-García Catalogue Raisonné. Designed by panOpticon, the online catalogue represents the culmination of over forty years of study led by Cecilia de Torres. The visually stunning and fully integrated site includes innovative features such as links between the works, the collections, the exhibitions and the published references; advanced filtering and search capabilities; the capacity to look at the works in sizes relative one to the other; as well as the ability for the user to see early exhibitions virtually recreated. Gathered together for the first time, the information in this unique website affords scholars, collectors, and the general public never-before access to Torres-García’s expansive artistic production.

Watch MoMA’s press remarks “Joaquín Torres-Garcia: The Arcadian Modern” on youTube.

Above left: Joaquín Torres-García. Construction in White and Black. 1938. Oil on paper mounted on wood, 31 3/4 x 40 1/8″ (80.7 x 102 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Patricia Phelps de Cisneros in honor of David Rockefeller. Photograph by Thomas Griesel. © Sucesión Joaquín Torres-García, Montevideo 2015

Above right: Joaquín Torres-García in his Montevideo studio, c.1939.

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panOpticon has developed innovative digital cataloging tools and a range of effective ways to make cultural content available for use online. Whether you are starting a catalogue from scratch, or looking for a more robust product for your current data, we have a software package that will meet your needs. Contact us to schedule a demonstration.

Check out our blog — catalog(ue) — a forum whose purpose is to help close the gap between traditional cataloging practices and the challenges we face when we use developing digital technologies to publish online.

Tom Thomson Launched


Tom Thomson. Woodland Interior-Fall, 1914

Tom Thomson Catalogue Raisonné Uses panOpticon Tools

“In 1970, I began this catalogue raisonné of Thomson’s work and I have continued it until 2009. As I worked, I became convinced that Thomson’s achievement had the almost too classic prerequisites of greatness: an indelible yet flexible visual style that extended the past, reflected its own time, and stayed fresh and relevant as it moved into the future. During these decades, I found that what I considered the value of his work changed for me. At times Thomson’s enormous gifts for colour and composition, bolstered by an underlying urgency, seemed most pertinent to the triumphant progress of Abstraction, and to Expressionism, as it once again became part of the stylistic mix of younger artists. Later, the life he lived in nature came to seem of importance: I noticed that many contemporary artists embraced the landscape almost as part of their calling.

“From 1970 on, I had the work of Thomson in private collections brought into the Art Gallery of Ontario to be photographed. In examining this material, and the Gallery collection of works by Thomson, I found myself fascinated with the inscriptions (often written by Dr. J.M. MacCallum, Thomson’s great patron and friend), on the backs of works and I began to believe they were important to the record. After I left the Gallery and became Director of The Robert McLaughlin Gallery in Oshawa from 1974 to 2000, and afterwards, I continued to record Thomson inscriptions and labels wherever I could, especially in works as they appeared at auction and in private collections. Even in 2009, incredibly it seemed to me, genuine Thomsons came my way to be recorded. Like every cataloguer who attempts omnipotence, the discovery of this work helped me realize my shortcomings. I would like to believe that I have included all the works by Tom Thomson that exist, but I realize that the field is open. New material will show up with time.”

Tom Thomson Catalogue Raisonné – researched and written by Joan Murray

Above: Tom Thomson. Woodland Interior-Fall. Fall 1914. Oil on composite wood-pulp board. 8 9/16 x 10 9/16 in. (21.7 x 26.9 cm). Thomson Collection @ Art Gallery of Ontario.

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Whether you are starting a catalogue from scratch, or looking for a more robust product for your current data, panOpticon has a software package that will meet your needs. Contact us to schedule a demonstration.

And check out our blog — catalog(ue) — a forum whose purpose is to help close the gap between traditional cataloging practices and the challenges we face when we use developing digital technologies to publish online.

FHLane Project in NYTimes


Fitz Henry Lane, Portrait of the Bark

“Catalogues Raisonnés Go Digital” — the New York Times, August 14, 2015

[The full article by Eve M. Kahn appeared in print on August 14, 2015, under 'Antiques' in the Art & Design Section on page C24 of the New York edition of the Times with the headline: "For Fitz Henry Lane and Other 19th-Century Painters, Catalogues Raisonnés Go Digital."]

“New technology and fresh perspectives are jumpstarting efforts to assemble exhaustive lists of works by 19th-century American painters, sometimes in progress for decades. Next month a consortium of museums interested in the Massachusetts maritime painter Fitz Henry Lane (1804–65) will introduce a website, fitzhenrylaneonline.org, documenting about 320 paintings, drawings and prints at various institutions. Much of the material is being drawn from the Cape Ann Museum, in Mr. Lane’s hometown, Gloucester, Mass., and images on the website will be linked to infrared paint analyses, biographies of Mr. Lane’s clients, newspaper ads for his suppliers, maps of harbors where he sketched and portraits of owners of the ships moored there.

“Mr. Lane’s recently rediscovered tableau of an 1840s sailing ship, scheduled to be added to the site, will be offered for auction (with an estimate of $150,000 to $250,000) on Aug. 26 at James D. Julia in Fairfield, Me.

“The Lane consortium is working with panOpticon, a Manhattan supplier of technology for comprehensive artist databases, known in the trade as catalogues raisonnés. Roger Shepherd, the company’s founder, said that the sites can link artworks to diary entries, restorers’ reports, photos of gallery installations and collectors’ homes, descriptions of related works that have been destroyed and more.

“Crowdsourcing would bring in more data, and persistent errors could be corrected. (Mr. Lane, for instance, is often erroneously called Fitz Hugh Lane.) Past owners could be identified as they emerge, which is increasingly crucial in an art market riddled with forgeries.

“’You don’t want holes in your provenance,’ Mr. Shepherd said.”

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Above: Fitz Henry Lane. Portrait of the Bark “Mary.” Photo courtesy Christie’s and James D. Julia, Inc.

Torres-García Catalogue Launched


Arthur Dove, Plant Forms, 1911–12

Joaquín Torres-García Online Catalogue – a First

The Joaquín Torres-García Catalogue Raisonné is the first online scholarly resource dedicated to the paintings and sculptures of the Uruguayan modernist artist (1874–1949). Gathered together for the first time, the information in this unique website affords scholars, collectors, and the general public never-before access to Torres-García’s expansive artistic production.

The website provides a comprehensive experience of the artist’s works, exhibitions and publications, as well as a chronology of his life and career—all liberally illustrated and linked to new digital images and related documentary materials. All the published materials in this online catalogue are free and accessible to anyone who registers.

The Joaquín Torres-García Catalogue Raisonné represents the culmination of over forty years of study led by Cecilia de Torres. Investigation about the artist remains ongoing, and is regularly reviewed and updated as research continues.

The website was designed by panOpticon who worked closely with the authors. The visually stunning and fully integrated site includes innovative features such as links between the works, the collections, the exhibitions and the published references; advanced filtering and search capabilities; the capacity to look at the works in sizes relative one to the other; as well as the ability for the user to see early exhibitions virtually recreated.

Above: Joaquín Torres-García in his Montevideo studio, c.1939.

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panOpticon has developed innovative digital cataloging tools and a range of effective ways to make cultural content available for use online. Whether you are starting a catalogue from scratch, or looking for a more robust product for your current data, we have a software package that will meet your needs. Contact us to schedule a demonstration.

Check out our blog — catalog(ue) — a forum whose purpose is to help close the gap between traditional cataloging practices and the challenges we face when we use developing digital technologies to publish online.

New Online Cézanne Launched


Paul Cézanne. La Montagne Sainte-Victoire vue du chemin de Valcros,

all the paintings of Paul Cézanne together at last in one place online

The Paintings of Paul Cézanne: An Online Catalogue Raisonné was officially launched on November 21st. The website takes Cézanne scholarship in new directions, while all the known paintings are being made available in color for the first time. The catalogue will benefit students, scholars, curators, collectors, galleries, and auction houses as well as anyone who wants to learn more about one of the most revered and influential painters of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Two of the catalogue’s three authors, Jayne Warman and Walter Feilchenfeldt, worked with John Rewald on the 1996 print version of the catalogue raisonné. But, it was co-author David Nash’s innovative idea four years ago to re-publish all the works in color. His initial idea of producing a printed full-color supplement to the print catalogue rapidly gave way to the more ambitious project of updating and revising the Rewald catalogue and putting the new research online.

The website was designed by panOpticon. What began as an extensive database evolved into a comprehensive online experience. Working closely with the authors, Roger Shepherd and Susannah Shepherd have created a visually stunning and fully integrated site with innovative features such as links between the works, the collections, the exhibitions and the published references; advanced filtering and search capabilities, including a powerful set of keywords in English and French; the capacity to see all the paintings in sizes relative one to the other; as well as the ability for the user to see early exhibitions virtually recreated.

See ARTnews “Cézanne Painting Catalogue Raisonné is Now Available Online.”

Above: Paul Cézanne. La Montagne Sainte-Victoire vue du chemin de Valcros, 1878–79, oil on canvas, Pushkin Museum, Moscow.

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panOpticon has developed innovative digital cataloging tools and a range of effective ways to make cultural content available for use online. Whether you are starting a catalogue from scratch, or looking for a more robust product for your current data, we have a software package that will meet your needs. Contact us to schedule a demonstration.

Lane Website Receives NEA


Arthur Dove, Plant Forms, 1911–12

Fitz Henry Lane Online Catalogue Receives Grant from the NEA

The Cape Ann Museum in Gloucester, Massachusetts is among the 2014 Grant recipients recently announced by the National Endowment for the Arts. The Museum is receiving funds

“to support development of the website, Fitz Henry Lane Online. This free and interactive searchable database will center on the paintings of 19th Century American painter Fitz Henry Lane (1804–65). Using the art objects as its foundation, the website will enable the viewer to explore the social, commercial, maritime, and artistic history of mid-19th Century New England by bringing together rare documents, high-quality images, and links to external resources from the collections of several different institutions.”

This important website is also receiving generous support from the Andrew and Betsy Wyeth Foundation for American Art.

panOpticon is proudly designing and building the Fitz Henry Lane website.

Learn more about the project.

Above: Fitz Henry Lane, Gloucester Harbor at Sunrise (detail), c.1850, oil on canvas,
Cape Ann Museum, Gloucester, Mass., Gift of Judge Lawrence Brooks, 1970

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panOpticon has developed innovative digital cataloging tools and a range of effective ways to make cultural content available for use online. Whether you are starting a catalogue from scratch, or looking for a more robust product for your current data, we have a software package that will meet your needs. Contact us to schedule a demonstration.

Check out our blog — catalog(ue) — a forum whose purpose is to help close the gap between traditional cataloging practices and the challenges we face when we use developing digital technologies to publish online.

A Beautiful Partnership


AIC Chicago 1918–19

John Folinsbee Considered
a new book reveals much about an under-appreciated artist
while it neatly ties together print and digital technologies

Folinsbee Considered is a hefty, 322 page, 10 x 12 inch volume, brimming with new color photographs—many are lush, full-page, larger than life-size details. Handsomely designed in bright red cloth, a self-portrait of the painter on the cover looking at us with characteristic confidence, the results are a vital testament to the continued life of the art book.

In addition to nine chapters of extensively researched and hitherto unavailable information about the life and work of John F. Folinsbee, the book contains a 56-page, densely packed Catalogue of Selected Landscape and Genre Paintings. The book’s author, Kirsten M. Jensen writes: “Each entry contains comprehensive information up to the time this book went to press, including provenance records, bibliographic citations, and exhibition histories . . .” She further points out:

“Those who wish to study paintings from a particular year or years intensively, or who want to see juvenilia, portraits, and works on paper, should consult the online Catalogue Raisonné (johnfolinsbee.org), which is continually updated to reflect new research on particular works and periods in Folinsbee’s career.”

As hefty as this book is, Ms. Jensen lets us know that we are in store for even more on the website. We are able to search the works online by themes and subjects, as well as find related works, preliminary sketches, and notebooks, none of which are included in the book. And this is just the beginning.

The book’s comprehensive Exhibition History 1912–2012 and substantial Literature section also have online counterparts.

“The Exhibition History is designed to be used in conjunction with the individual records in the Selected Catalogue as well as the entire known oeuvre as presented on the catalogue raisonné website . . . . The catalogue raisonné website gives the user the opportunity to see an exhibition as it was arranged at the time (if exhibition catalogue numbers are available) by selecting the Gallery View option from the Exhibition Index. Exhibitions are also hyper-linked, enabling a user to move back and forth between individual records and the Exhibition Index pages.”

By generating finished, accurate files for print during its production, the same online database that powers the Folinsbee website made the catalogue sections of this superb book possible.

We at panOpticon wish to congratulate Kirsten and the John F. Folinsbee Art Trust on the publication of Folinsbee Considered (Hudson Hills Press, 2013). We are also extremely proud that our content management system is at the heart of the John F. Folinsbee Catalogue Raisonné.

Above: Folinsbee’s Queensboro Bridge (far left) and Approaching Dusk (far right), in the galleries at the Art Institute of Chicago, photographed in 1918. Click the photo above to see the works in the exhibition online.

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Whether you are an individual starting a catalogue from scratch, or an institution looking for a more robust product for your current data, we have a software package that will meet your needs.

The best way to understand what our tools can do is to see them at work — contact us to schedule a demonstration.

Check out our blog — catalog(ue) — a forum whose purpose is to help close the gap between traditional cataloging practices
and the challenges we face when we use developing digital technologies to publish online.

Cézanne Catalogue in ARTnews


Kay Sage, I Have No Shadow (detail), 1940

“Online is the way to go,” say the producers of the
Paul Cézanne Catalogue Raisonné

“David Nash’s brainchild, about eight years ago, was to publish Cézanne’s paintings in color,” explains catalogue raisonné co-author Jayne Warman. “So he started to gather images from wherever he could get them, and he had planned to publish a picture book, as far as I could tell. Then Walter [Feilchenfeldt] and I became involved and convinced him that, really, online is the way to go.” Nash adds, “The advantages of doing it as a website were so immediately apparent.”

These and other observations from the producers of the Paul Cézanne Catalogue Raisonné can be found in the March issue of ARTnews.[1] The article enumerates more than a few good reasons to publish a catalogue such as this one online, not the least of which is perpetual timeliness. “Any catalogue raisonné in book form is out of date the moment it is published, because there is always nearly immediately new information available,” says Feilchenfeldt. “The big advantage is that a catalogue online can be constantly upgraded.”

Read the article online.

We at panOpticon are extremely proud that our content management system is at the heart of the Paul Cézanne Catalogue Raisonné and that they have commissioned us to build the online site.

[1] Trent Morse. “Cézanne in Cyberspace.” ARTnews (March 2014), pp. 48–49.

Above: Cézanne’s The Aqueduct at Écluse, 1890–94 (left), was renamed The Burned-Out Mill at Charentonneau when the site, seen in an old postcard on the right, was recently rediscovered.

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Whether you are an individual starting a catalogue from scratch, or an institution looking for a more robust product for your current data, we have a software package that will meet your needs.

The best way to understand what our tools can do is to see them at work — contact us to schedule a demonstration.

Check out our blog — catalog(ue) — a forum whose purpose is to help close the gap between traditional cataloging practices
and the challenges we face when we use developing digital technologies to publish online.

The Right Connections


[This month's featured catalog(ue) post, "Linked in," by Kirsten M. Jensen reveals how she is able to draw a larger audience to her catalogue's online content while expanding it's outward reach.]

John Folinsbee died in 1972, forgotten, for the most part, outside the confines of the artistic hamlet of New Hope, Pennsylvania, where he lived most of his adult life. Few remembered his forthright realism, the robust brushwork and color that enlivened his canvases, and the dramatic play of light and shadow that infused them with mood and atmosphere. Forty years later, an exhibition review in the New York Times, also published online, mentioned Queensboro Bridge by Folinsbee (included in the show), and linked to the artist’s online catalogue raisonné.

Catalogues raisonnés can do a lot to resurrect the life and work of an artist, but for the work to have continued relevance for contemporary audiences, links like these are increasingly important. The exponential explosion of data on the web can be dizzying, but for a scholar, or an editor of a catalogue raisonné, the availability of relevant and related materials can also be enriching. With the Exhibition and Literature features, for example, there are a number of ways that external content—exhibition reviews or articles, in the case of Folinsbee’s Queensboro Bridge—can be linked to a particular work, thereby broadening the scope in which it is considered. The painting was not illustrated in the Times review, but the link to the artist’s catalogue not only gave the interested reader an image to look at, but access to the more than 1600 documented works in the artist’s oeuvre, essays, and additional content. Conversely, a link from the online catalogue to the review further contextualizes his work by enabling the scholar to examine it alongside images of paintings by his peers. John Folinsbee, linked in.

Kirsten M. Jensen, PhD is Research Director & Editor of the online John F. Folisbee Catalogue Raisonné.

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The exhibition Industrial Sublime: Modernism and the Transformation of New York’s Rivers, 1900-1940, curated by Kirsten M. Jensen and Bartholomew F. Bland, will be at the Hudson River Museum from October 12, 2013–January 17, 2014.

Top of page: John F. Folinsbee, Queensboro Bridge (detail), 1917, oil on canvas, 32 x 40 in. (81.28 x 101.6 cm), private collection.

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panOpticon has developed a comprehensive set of digital cataloging tools and a range of effective ways to make cultural content available for use online. The best way to understand what the tools can do is to see them at work. Feel free to schedule a demonstration.