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For the first time curators, writers, historians, teachers, students, appraisers, wealth managers, galleries, museums, libraries, archives, auction houses, collectors, insurers, educational institutions, estates, foundations, artists, and all the others invested in this vast territory are able to share credible information and give feedback to one another.

The results of their efforts are no longer static collections of records and documents to be occasionally referenced by a few, but are instead, organic processes that play a dynamic and public role in both the appreciation and the business of art.

Leverage data as soon as they are usable — usability means traceable chains of evidence.
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“It is our intention not only to provide an historical record of Sam Francis’s artworks, but also to embrace his creative and innovative spirit by offering a catalogue that can evolve and change as research continues to develop.”

Debra Burchett-Lere
Director, Sam Francis Foundation
Sam Francis: Online Catalogue Raisonné Project:
Unique Works on Paper and Expanded Version of Canvas and Panel Paintings 1945–1953

 

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read about panOpticon in ARTnews

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Top of page from left to right in descending order: Paul Cézanne (1839–1906) Still Life with Apples 1895-98, The Museum of Modern Art: Lillie P. Bliss Collection (22.1934); László Moholy-Nagy (1895–1946) Head (Lucia Moholy), c. 1926 The Museum of Modern Art: Anonymous gift (505.1939). © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn; Kay Sage (1898–1963) The Great Impossible 1961, The Museum of Modern Art: Kay Sage Tanguy Bequest (1132.1964); Sam Francis (1923–94) in front of Turquoise and Pink at Galerie Nina Dausset, Paris, 1952; Arshile Gorky (1904-48), Study for Mother and Son, c. 1936. Whitney Museum of American Art: Purchased with funds from The Lauder Foundation, Evelyn and Leonard Lauder Fund and the Drawing Committee (99.49a-b) © Artist’s estate; Larry Bell (1939– ) Standing Walls (detail, from 6 X 6 an improvisation). Photo © Alex Marks, courtesy The Chinati Foundation, Marfa, TX; Fitz Henry Lane (1804–65) Lighthouse at Camden, Maine 1851. Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Conn., Gift of the Teresa and H. John Heinz III Foundation (1992.122.1). Photo: Yale University Art Gallery; Roy Lichtenstein (1923–97) Girl with Ball, 1961. The Museum of Modern Art: Gift of Philip Johnson. (421.1981); John Singer Sargent (1856–1925) The Daughters of Edward Darley Boit, 1882. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston: Gift of Mary Louisa Boit, Julia Overing Boit, Jane Hubbard Boit, and Florence D. Boit in memory of their father, Edward Darley Boit. Photo: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.